The Very First Steps Of Successful Salon Marketing Strategies

Successful marketing strategy - woman in training outfit

We were asked  a fantastic question recently for our #AskPhorest video series hosted on Facebook. A question that we felt we should spotlight and delve a bit further into on the Phorest Salon Blog.

And that question was:

“I would like to start doing marketing but I really don’t have a clue where to start, how often can I contact my clients and what are the options? Can you please help with this?”

In terms of salon marketing strategies, we can sometimes jump straight into the deep end without taking a step back and looking at what the first step should actually be.

So myself and the Phorest Marketing Manager Connor Keppel sat down and discussed what are the most important areas to focus on when kicking off salon marketing strategies.

You can watch the #AskPhorest episode right here:

#AskPhorest ep. 5 – First Steps To Salon Marketing Strategies

(Click Here For Mobile Users)

Since the person in question already had a salon with clients inside, we decided to start there:

Looking into salon marketing strategies for business owners who already have their doors open.

What we determined was, the first thing you should do is focus on your existing clients. Ensure that they come back to you for their next appointment. The best way to do this is through incentivisation!

Try to get them to book their next appointment while they pay. And ensure they give you their contact details (email, phone number, etc), so that you can hit them with some of your sms & email salon marketing strategies.

SMS is a fantastic way to contact them. It is guaranteed that they will see the message. So I’d recommend sending one to your clients once or twice a month (space it out).

However, your email salon marketing strategies can be a bit more consistent. Put one out to your clients once a week or so.

The main thing to remember is to mix your content. It can’t all be sales/advertising.

So for one week put out a Newsletter going through the unique offers you have for the month.

The next one, maybe send them some expert tips that will help them look and feel beautiful.

You see, you are still contacting them (letting them know you exist), but it’s not another hard sell. Clients respond much better to that!

If you’d like to know more about getting clients returning, then check out this article: Become A Master Of Customer Service Through Your Salon Client Card!

But What About New Clients?

salon-new-clients

From there, you leverage these existing clients to try and get their friends, family and colleagues to start coming to your salon.

You can do this with a strong loyalty programme where you reward clients for referrals. Our  acclaimed Loyalty System is called the TreatCard and it is one of the greatest tools salon owners have in their salon marketing strategies!

For more info, make sure you check out our article:Your Bible to Running an Extraordinarily Successful Salon Loyalty Program

You can also encourage clients to share photos of your work on their social media pages (Ask us about how Phorest’s #SalonSelfie feature can help with that).

And there it is! These are the first steps to creating viable, successful salon marketing strategies that WILL work.

Thanks for reading & thank you for the question.

If you have a salon marketing question that you’d like us to answer on #AskPhorest, please drop it in the comments below and we’ll answer it…. With a video!

#LetsGrow

  • Good afternoon my favourite industry bloggers. let’s put the flip side to this.

    Just to nit pick to start off with that is not a strategy, that is a list of steps. A marketing strategy is the end point of a marketing campaign, let me explain. You have decided that you want to be the place known for the best style cut in your market. You then outline the steps you need to do to get there, strategy is a USP and then you ways to achieve that USP. So now we know what strategy is and what marketing steps are.

    Incentivising customers is never the highbrow way to bring in long lasting clients, it puts pressure on the client and in many research studies has a negative effect on the perception of the business. If you have given the client an amazing experience, they will go out of their way to tell people about it. Do you need a referral incentive to tell your friends about the best hairdresser in town? We naturally refer because we enjoy sharing value with our friends.

    Let’s address SMS, if you are in the UK people are not going to be very happy with you sending them SMS, they just don’t like it and it is seen as an invasion of personal connection. Ireland on the other hand respond well to SMS, so in a nutshell it very much depends on the location you are in. On top of this there are very strict laws governing SMS promotion. Gaining their details is not enough, they need to agree to a mobile marketing terms and conditions otherwise you are breaking the CANN laws, and no one wants to get in trouble for doing that.

    The current legislation states that B2C unsolicited marketing via email, and mobile, will be permitted only if recipients have given prior consent or ‘opted-in’ to receive information via these channels. For B2B marketing to corporate subscribers (limited companies, PLCs, government organisations and the like), unsolicited e-mails and mobile marketing may be sent without opt-in consent; however, senders must offer each recipient a chance to opt out. This must be on the SMS itself and automated just like email marketing.

    The big misconception of frequency breeds more engagement in email marketing. Engagement is not independent of frequency. As you send more, engagement per campaign goes down. Sending out an email a week I can almost assure you is going to have a negative effect on your list. Splitting the campaign between value and offer is not a great idea. You will find much more interaction and value if your newsletter is just that. At Zest, we send two newsletters per month, the first is Club Zest that is married to useful content within the email. The second goes out half way through the month. The only divergence from that methodology is splitting out the unopened and sending again to them only at a separate time.

    I am not going to address the salon selfie, as that borders on narcissistic and slowly more data is coming together about the negative effects the selfie is bringing to a wider demographic.

    I refrained from addressing the social media calendar you put out there, but I can say if you follow that methodology of inspirational quotes and fluffy cats you are not going to get the traction of social you are looking for.

    As always best of luck in all that you do
    Padraig
    Brand Manager
    Zest ~ Discover the best version of you

    • Hello Padraig and thanks for reading.

      Agree on some of your comments for sure although I think we kind of already say some of them 😉

      On the ‘nit pick’, we are saying the strategy for growth is focusing on your existing clients. This post is about the ‘first steps’ as part of that strategy as the title points out.

      We don’t agree with incentivising referrals either. We agree with REWARDING them, hence the usage of the word in the post. The magic is in an SMS that goes out (or email) saying because you have referred ‘Mary Smith’ you get extra TreatCard points –> it is a sincere thank you that’s unexpected as opposed to in your face ‘Bring your friend Mary in and get 20 quid off’ –> totally agree with you on that.

      On the SMS Padraig, agree completely about data laws, hence the reason we have careful opt-ins. However re: them not liking SMS and the frequency of email, it is ALL down to providing value in the content and FILTERING. You must, must, cycles mails in terms of content and target audience. Our data in UK shows us very clearly what works and what doesn’t so more to come on that. (There’s another post in that probably).

      The selfie having a negative effect on wider demographic I can’t really comment on as I’m not qualified in that field 😉 However, using imagery of a service generated by a client and not the salon, is a powerful way generate referrals -> again our data shows that. I’m not really sure it’s narcistic for a client to leave Zest for example and want to show off something that makes them feel good and look great after deciding to spend their hard-earned cash with you. I think you will find it actually is a great non-incentivised way of generating referrals as we talked about earlier (works better for hair salons though we find).

      As always Padraig, we’ll have to agree to disagree on some stuff but generally we’re aligned. 😉

      Chat soon
      Connor K

      • Hi Connor always like a little engagement, it helps all to find the good oil. It is true hair does alter some things over beauty salons for sure. Our hair salon actually opens we are hoping, in January bar any unforeseen delays. So will be looking very much at specific hair promotions very soon.

        The word selfie in many ways causes the knee jerk reaction, but with so much data about at the moment with the promotion of the ‘self’, I do heed a caution with that style of promotions. I am no clinical Psychologist, although did major in consumer Psychology as it married so well with the marketing discipline , so I suppose it does influence my thought paths.

        Incentivising, rewarding sort of the same side of a different coin although do understand the thinking. What we tend to look at is what is everyone doing, as this often shows opportunity within the sectors. It does so often come down to a closely split hair as it could simply be argued that Club Zest is a reward incentivised system so I should most likely not try and take any high road there.

        We will have to agree to disagree on the frequency thing regarding email, I just have too much data around that and too many years experience to agree with you on that one. Although again it can vary on demo, target etc and so forth so hard to draw solid conclusions. Although I know that the frequency of some of out majors is really annoying, (one is signed up to most email newsletters from the competitors) 🙂 Always good to see who is doing what.

        Overall I would have to agree we tend to be quite aligned, but damn it would be boring if I just dropped in to say, what a great article yada yada. Always enjoy a little banter when it comes to marketing Connor.

        As is the way, Enjoy all that you do
        Padraig
        Zest – The best version of you
        Coming soon A hairy Yak 🙂 – Take care Connor look forward to the next post, with Zest in my step even

  • Hello Padraig and thanks for reading.

    Agree on some of your comments for sure although I think we kind of already say some of them 😉

    On the ‘nit pick’, we are saying the strategy for growth is focusing on your existing clients. This post is about the ‘first steps’ as part of that strategy as the title points out.

    We don’t agree with incentivising referrals either. We agree with REWARDING them, hence the usage of the word in the post. The magic is in an SMS that goes out (or email) saying because you have referred ‘Mary Smith’ you get extra TreatCard points –> it is a sincere thank you that’s unexpected as opposed to in your face ‘Bring your friend Mary in and get 20 quid off’ –> totally agree with you on that.

    On the SMS Padraig, agree completely about data laws, hence the reason we have careful opt-ins. However re: them not liking SMS and the frequency of email, it is ALL down to providing value in the content and FILTERING. You must, must, cycles mails in terms of content and target audience. Our data 6
    null in UK shows us very clearly what works and what doesn’t so more to come on that. (There’s another post in that probably).

    The selfie having a negative effect on wider demographic I can’t really comment on as I’m not qualified in that field 😉 However, using imagery of a service generated by a client and not the salon, is a powerful way generate referrals -> again our data shows that. I’m not really sure it’s narcistic for a client to leave Zest for example and want to show off something that makes them feel good and look great after deciding to spend their hard-earned cash with you. I think you will find it actually is a great non-incentivised way of generating referrals as we talked about earlier.

    As always Padraig, we’ll have to agree to disagree on some stuff but generally we’re aligned. 😉

    Chat soon
    Connor K